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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)
was reported. what we coknow is there are thousands of them and the obama administration has assured us and the public before this came out that it happens infrequently, once in a while. >> warner: now, equally
grew chillier today. president obama scrapped a planned summit in september, with russian president vladimir putin. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, edward snowden's asylum, syria and more are all weighing on u.s.-russia relations. we dissect what's behind today's diplomatic rebuke. >> ifill: then, a sweeping overhaul of the nation's mortgage finance system. margaret warner explores the president's latest housing plan. >> brown: many people with disabilities still don't get home-based or community services. judy woodruff reports on the struggle to fully implement a landmark civil rights law. >> think about it as segregation. people are still segregated. it's wrong, it's wrong morally, economically and it's wrong in compliance with americans with disbill teeth acts. >> ifill: tempers often flare as the temperature outside rises. could climate change be making us more violent? ray suarez dives into the details of a new study. >> brown: and a powerful drama based on the true story of one man's last day, before being fatally shot
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama promised new safeguards and more transparency for secret government surveillance programs even as he defended their existence. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: the president stressed the government is not interested in spying on ordinary citizens. we have excerpts from the white house's news conference. >> there are steps we can take to give the american people additional confidence that there are additional safeguards against abuse. so i've directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. >> woodruff: then, despite recent challenging moments of diplomacy, the u.s. and russia held high-level meetings in washington. margaret warner recaps today's talks. >> brown: four out of ten street lights don't work and it takes an hour on average for detroit police to respond to 9-1-1 calls. hari sreenivasan looks at the motor city's battle amid bankruptcy. >> detroiters are so used to bad news,
effectively than we do. >> ifill: tensions in the obama- putin relationship were clearly evident at the g-8 summit in ireland last june, after they clashed over syria. today, kremlin officials expressed their own disappointment at the u.s. decision to forego the summit. but they said president putin's invitation still stands. mr. obama still plans to attend the g-20 gathering in st. petersburg, next month, but has added a side visit to sweden instead. and secretary of state john kerry and defense secretary chuck hagel will meet with their russian counterparts in washington on friday. >> brown: was the president right to cancel the meeting? and where does this leave u.s.- russian relations? stephen sestanovich teaches international diplomacy at columbia university. he served in the state department during the reagan and clinton administrations. dimitri simes is president of the center for the national interest. he just returned from a trip to russia where he met with senior russian officials. welcome to both of you. stephen sestanovich was it the snowden asylum in the end that led to this an
programs following the leaks from former spy agency contractor edward snowden. mr. obama was asked if today's move changed his mindset about snowden. >> is he now more a whistle- blower than he is a hacker, as you called him at one point, or somebody that shouldn't be filed charges? and should he be provided more protection? is he a patriot? >> i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. as i said in my opening remarks, i called for a thorough review of our surveillance operations before mr. snowden made these leaks. my preference-- and i think the american people's preference-- would have been for a lawful, orderly examination of these laws; a thoughtful, fact-based debate that would then lead us to a better place, because i never made claims that all the surveillance technologies that have developed since the time some of these laws had been put in place somehow didn't require, potentially, some additional reforms. that's exactly what i called for. that somehow they got there willy, nilly, just sucking in information on everybody and doing what we please with it. that's not the case. our law
attention at the scene. >>> the obamas have a new addition, meet sunny obama, their newest family member who just arrived at the white house. megan alexander reports on the first family's sunny day. >> the first family's new dog, sunny, clearly loving her white house digs, comes from a small town in michigan. the 14-month-old portuguese water dog is believed to have come fr a breeder 60 miles from detroit, taking the placement of puppies very seriously, saying we match the puppy to the right family. enter the first family. michelle obama welcomed sunny, named for her cheerful disposition, with a tweet. president obama chimed in, welcome to the family, sunny. the obamas chose another allergy friendly portuguese water dog like bo because of 15- year-old malea's allergies. >> they are fun dogs. and easy to train. >> we caught up with a dog trainer in new york. >> what type of training would you recommend for sunny? >> to remember that even sunny is a year old, doesn't mean they need help to adjust. you need to make sure you're teaching your dog to greet people politely, to sit, the breed tends
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: the obama administration released classified documents today outlining the national security agency's massive collection of domestic phone records. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: the release comes amid reports of a new n.s.a. spying program on internet activity. we look at the latest revelations and the secret court at the center of the controversy. >> ifill: then, ben bernanke's tenure as federal reserve chairman nears its end, as the debate over who will replace him begins. we examine how that choice could affect the economic recovery. >> brown: egypt's government ordered police to take all means necessary to disband protests in support of the ousted president. margaret warner explores the potential for violence and the actions of the new military rule. >> ifill: and in india, child labor is outlawed, but a staggering number of children still toil away. fred de sam lazaro reports on efforts to change that practice. >> the combination of official and middle-c
's release has u.s. officials weighing whether to cancel president obama's planned summit with putin next month. >> we will obviously be in contact with russian authorities, expressing our extreme disappointment in this decision and making the case clearly that there is absolute legal justification for mr. snowden to be returned to the united states where he is under indictment on three charges felony charges. >> brown: meanwhile, the president met privately with a bipartisan group of house and senate lawmakers to address concerns about the n.s.a.'s surveillance programs. back in russia, snowden now has a grant of asylum for at least a year. that can be extended indefinitely, and he even has the right to seek russian citizenship. a short time ago i spoke to paul sonne of the "wall street journal" in moscow. paul, thanks for joining us. how much of a surprise was this in moscow? >> i wasn't a particular surprise. there was a lot of writing on the wall here that the kremlin was going to make this decision and the real question is why was the kremlin predisposed to granting edward snowden a
. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: tonight, an exclusive interview with president obama at the white house. >> woodruff: we discuss the potential for military action in syria. >> we do have to make sure is that when countries break international norms on weapons like chemical weapons that could threaten us, that they are held accountable. >> ifill: and we get his take on race relations in america, following his speech at the lincoln memorial today, 50 years after the march on washington. >> no one can match king's brilliance but the same flame can light the heart of all who are willing to take a first step towards justice. i know that flame remains. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcast
? >> it will need to be more precise to make it clear what you agree to. the obama administration is work hard on a new way to approach this so it is not so ambiguous so science can flourish and have the opportunity to be pants and not just subjects. >> warner: francis collins, director of the nsa, thank you. >> brown: next, an organization that believes there's no place like home when it comes to growing older. ray suarez has our report. >> how are you? >> reporter: once a week, 82- year-old john sears gets picked up at his beacon hill townhouse, and driven to a nearby grocery store. sears looks forward to that weekly outing, and not just to replenish his pantry. >> what else can i get for you? >> reporter: but for the simple joy of getting out, seeing people, catching up on neighborhood news, all harder to do as age makes it more challenging to get around. sears doesn't hire the driver, bob spicer. he works for beacon hill village: it's a non-profit, membership organization providing low-cost services to seniors who want to continue to live in their own homes. >> they call all the time. a co
in the streets. >> woodruff: president obama delivered that rebuke to egypt's government today, in the wake of a bloody crackdown on protesters, that left more than 600 hundred dead and thousands wounded. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: as egyptians regroup after a wave of bloodshed and chaos, pockets of violence still persist. we get an on-the-ground report from cairo and debate options for the u.s. >> woodruff: then, the u.s. defense department rolled out its plan to curb sexual assaults in the military. we dig into the details and discuss whether more needs to be done. >> brown: the maker of the painkiller oxycontin refuses to disclose a full list of doctors who may over-prescribe the addictive drug. we have the latest on an investigation by the los angeles times and new pressure from lawmakers. >> woodruff: the nation of myanmar is home to one of the world's most persecuted minorities-- the rohinga. we have the harrowing tale of what happens when this group of muslims try to flee to safety. >> it looks like a cross between a t
, according to vermon1 senator patrick leahy's ovation the obama administration has suspended assistance temporarily. white house spokesman josh earnest insisted that was not true. >> this is part of a complex and broad relationship that we have with the egyptians. that review that the president ordered to early july has not concluded and reports to the contrary that -- published reports to the contrary that suggest that assistance to egypt has been cut off are not accurate. >> but leahy's office stood by its claim in a statement saying the state department and foreign operations appropriations subcommittee was told that the transfer of military aid was stopped, that this is current practice, not necessarily official policy, and there is no occasion of how long it will last. meanwhile administration cabinet members met at the white house this afternoon to discuss the egypt aid question further. >> for more on how much influence the u.s. and other nations have on the uncertain situation in egypt, i'm joined by talrak massu from the john f. kennedy school of government and the washington b
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama announced sweeping changes which could make college more affordable and accountable. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, at the core of the president's plan-- a rating system to see which colleges teach well while holding down costs. we get the details and ask if it is the right way to go. >> woodruff: then, u.s. intelligence weighs evidence of a possible poison gas attack that may have killed hundreds outside damascus. margaret warner looks at outrage around the world. >> suarez: a fresh series of secret tapes reveals former president nixon's attempts to control the watergate scandal. we hear excerpts and discuss what they tell us. >> woodruff: and we look at the personalities driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public goo
viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the obama administration today laid out its case, in detail, that the syrian government used chemical weapons on its own people last week. secretary of state john kerry minced no words in a blunt accounting of the attack. and, president obama made clear the u.s. is still making plans for a punitive military strike. again, be advised that some of the images may be disturbing. >> the united states government now knows that at least 1,429 syrians were killed in this attack, including at least 426 children. >> brown: the chilling numbers stood out from the u.s. intelligence assessment released this afternoon. and lest anyone doubt, the secretary of state insisted, "its findings are as clear as they are compelling." >> our intelligence community has carefully reviewed and re- reviewed information regarding this attack. and i will tell you it has done so more than mindful of the iraq experience. we will not repeat that moment. >> brown: kerry said the evidence this time was drawn from "thousands of sources", and he starkly recounted u.s. conclusions
captioning sponsored by >> ifill: the obama administration declared today the syrian government did use poison gas on its citizens and the u.s. will hold the assad regime accountable. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, after facing sniper fire, u.n. inspectors arrived at the site of the alleged chemical weapons attack in syria.. we have the latest on the investigation, and look at options on the table for a u.s. response. >> ifill: a massive wildfire near yosemite national park has engulfed more than 200 square miles, threatening key sources of water and power for the city of san francisco. jeffrey brown gets the latest on the dangerous blaze. >> woodruff: we continue our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama called the alleged chemical weapons attack in syria a grave concern and added, "as difficult as the problem is, it will require america's attention." good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, the united nations announced today one million children have been driven from syria by their country's bloody civil war. we take a closer look at the swelling number of refugees, particularly the young. >> woodruff: separate juries delivered guilty verdicts today in two high profile military cases. army major nadal hassan was convicted of murder for the deadly shooting spree aimed at unarmed u.s. soldiers at fort hood, texas. >> warner: and staff sergeant robert bales was sentenced to life without parole in the massacre of 16 innocent afghan civilians. we get details of both military court outcomes. >> woodruff: and in a separate military case-- the army private found guilty of giving troves of highly classified information to wikileaks-- now wants to live as a
.s. and other western powers against the syrian regime. today, in washington, the obama administration was still marshalling its evidence and still not ready to present it publicly. in his "newshour" interview last night, the president said it's clear who's behind chemical attacks in syria. >> we have concluded that the syrian government in fact carried these out. and if that's so, then there need to be international consequences. >> brown: even so, the associated press quoted multiple u.s. intelligence officials today as saying the evidence is not a slam dunk, and does not yet tie any use of poison gas to president bashar al-assad's inner circle. that brought this response from white house spokesman josh earnest, dismissing suggestions of a split over the intelligence. >> there is a preponderance of publicly available evidence to indicate that the assad regime carried out chemical weapons attacks in syria. that is what the president has said. the vice president said that. the secretary of state said that. we've also seen our partners all around the globe say that. >> brown: the president tasked
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)